MIAMI board

CRADLE OF

COACHES

INDUCTEES
Earl Blaik

EARL BLAIK

The College Football Hall of Famer was a three-year football letter winner (1915-17) and helped Miami win back-to-back Ohio Conference Championships (1916-17). Blaik began his head coaching career at Dartmouth (1934-40), but he is perhaps best known for his time as head coach of the United States Military Academy (1941-58). During his 18 seasons at West Point, Blaik guided Army to 121 wins, including back-to-back national championships (1944-45). He was named the National Coach of the Year in 1946 and coached three Heisman Trophy Winners--Doc Blanchard (1945), Glenn Davis (1946) and Pete Dawkins (1958). Blaik was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1986. He died in 1989 at the age of 92.

CARMEN COZZA

CARMEN COZZA

A member of Miami's "Cradle of Coaches" and the College Football Hall of Fame, Cozza earned three letters with the Red and White (1949-51) and was part of the 1950 squad that went 9-1 and defeated Arizona State, 34-21, in the Salad Bowl. Cozza was as an assistant coach at Miami (1956-62) but is best known for his work as head coach of Yale, where he coached for 32 seasons (1965-96). Cozza's Bulldogs won or shared 11 Ivy League titles, and he produced 118 All-Ivy league players, five National Football Foundation Scholar-Athletes, and seven Rhodes Scholars.

WEEB EWBANK

WEEB EWBANK

A Miami letter winner (1927) and a member of the Professional Football Hall of Fame, Ewbank began his coaching career at Washington University (1947-48) before moving to the professional ranks. Ewbank started his pro coaching career with the Baltimore Colts (1954-62) and led the Colts to the 1958 and 1959 National Football League titles. He then became coach of the New York Jets (1963-73) and won the 1968 American Football League title and 1969 Super Bowl when Joe Namath guaranteed a Jets victory over the heavily-favored Colts. Ewbank is the only professional coach to win NFL and AFL championships. He passed away on Nov. 17, 1998 at the age of 91.

JOHN PONT

JOHN PONT

Pont was a three-year letter winner (1949-51) and is one of only three Miami football players to have his number (No. 42) retired. Pont amassed 2,457 career rushing yards and 24 rushing touchdowns. A three-time all-conference and all-Ohio selection, Pont also received All-America honors twice. He worked at Miami as an assistant coach (1953-55) and head coach (1956-62) before coaching at Yale (1963-64), Indiana (1965-72) and Northwestern (1973-77). He was named collegiate Coach of the Year in 1967 when he led Indiana to a share of the Big Ten title and a berth in the Rose Bowl. Pont died in 2008 at the age of 80.

PAUL BROWN

PAUL BROWN

An Ohio native who was a two-year Miami football letter winner (1928-29), Brown excelled as a coach at the collegiate and professional levels. Brown was head coach at Ohio State (1941-43) and led the Buckeyes to their first national title in 1942. Brown then served as head coach at the professional level with the Cleveland Browns (1946-62) and Cincinnati Bengals (1968-75), winning championships in the All-America Football Conference and the National Football League. Brown was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1967, and the current home stadium of the Bengals bears his name. He died in 1991 at the age of 82. In the fall of 2012, a statue of Brown was erected at Yager Stadium's Cradle of Coaches Plaza.

PAUL DIETZEL

PAUL DIETZEL

A two-year football letter winner (1946-47), Dietzel played on the 1947 Miami squad which went 9-0-1 and defeated Texas Tech, 13-12, in the Sun Bowl for the program's first bowl game victory. Dietzel then coached at Louisiana State (1955-62), where he led the Tigers to the 1958 national championship, the United States Military Academy (1962-65), and the University of South Carolina (1966-74) before being inducted in Miami's "Cradle of Coaches." Dietzel is one of only two Miami football players ever named to the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA) All-America team, as he was a second-team honoree in 1947 as a center. He passed away on Sept. 24, 2013 at the age of 89.

ARA PARSEGHIAN

ARA PARSEGHIAN

A member of Miami's "Cradle of Coaches" and the College Football Hall of Fame, Parseghian was a football letter winner (1946-47) before moving to the sidelines as an assistant coach (1950) and then head coach (1951-55). During his five seasons as Miami's head man, Parseghian compiled a 39-6-1 record and won back-to-back Mid-American Conference Championships (1954-55). Parseghian went on to coach at Northwestern (1956-63) and Notre Dame (1964-74), where he was named National Coach of the Year in 1964. That season, Fighting Irish quarterback John Huarte won the Heisman Trophy.

BO SCHEMBECHLER

BO SCHEMBECHLER

A College Football Hall of Fame member, Schembechler was a two-year letter winner (1949-50) and head coach (1963-68) with the Red and White. During his six seasons as head coach, Schembechler led Miami to a 40-17-3 record and back-to-back conference co-championships (1965-66). He then became the head coach at Michigan (1969-89), being named collegiate Coach of the Year in his very first season at Ann Arbor. Schembechler led the Wolverines to 13 Big Ten titles and, as a head coach, he never had a losing season. He died in 2006 at the age of 77.

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